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Monday, August 16, 2021

PBS Graduate Student Orientation
TBA
TBA

Saturday, August 28, 2021

PBS Diversity Virtual Open House
09:00am-04:00pm
Virtual Event

Wednesday, September 01, 2021

Brown Bag (BCN): Data Blitz
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, September 03, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre

Wednesday, September 08, 2021

Brown Bag (Cognition): Data Blitz
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, September 10, 2021

PBS Graduate Research Symposium 2021
09:00am-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
PBS Graduate Research Symposium Reception
04:00pm-05:00pm
Lobby outside B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Saturday, September 11, 2021

BBIP Retreat
09:00am-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, September 17, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre
In this talk, I’ll dive into how our perception is shaped by linguistic input. To do so, I’ll present two lines of my research program. In the first, I’ll argue how language experience is unique to each and every one of us, and what it means to be on the spectrum of bi/multilingualism from the speaker’s side as well as from the listener’s side. I’ll present behavioral data and social network corpus data showing perception of different multilingual experiences, some of which are perceived as foreign accents, and how environmental exposure impacts speech intelligibility and accentedness judgments. In the second, I’ll argue how language experience modulates visuo-cortical processes towards novel objects (i.e., sheinbugs) by showing ERP and ssVEP data from infants as well as adults. The overarching theme of my talk will emphasize the importance of intersectional linguistic research. 
12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Monday, September 27, 2021

07:30pm
Hadley Stage Hancher Auditorium
POSTPONED Due to a scheduling conflict, Bill Nye has postponed his lecture at the University of Iowa. A new date will be announced soon. UI students who already have tickets should keep them as they will be honored for the new date. Distribution of remaining tickets to the general public will be delayed until the lecture has been officially rescheduled.   Engineer, comedian, author, inventor—and best known for his Emmy-winning run as Bill Nye the Science Guy—Bill Nye blends humor, intellectual curiosity, and devotion to solving some of the world’s most complex challenges through science. Nye inspires audiences of all ages to engage with and improve our world.This lecture will feature an American Sign Language interpreter. ARTIST WEBSITE

Wednesday, September 29, 2021

Brown Bag (BCN): Kev You
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, October 01, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
This virtual mini-symposium on sleep features presentations from: Gina Poe, PhD (UCLA); Penny Lewis, PhD (Cardiff U, UK); and Reto Huber PhD (U Zurich and U Children's Hospital Zurich)

Saturday, October 02, 2021

PBS Diversity Weekend
TBA
TBA

Wednesday, October 06, 2021

Brown Bag (Cognition): Sebastian Musslick, Princeton University
12:30pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
On the Rational Bounds of Human Cognition
Abstract: Humans are remarkably limited in the number of tasks they can execute simultaneously. This limitation is not only apparent in daily life, it is also a universal assumption of most theories of human cognition. Yet, a rationale for why the human brain is subject to this constraint remains elusive. In this talk, I will draw on insights from neuroscience, psychology, and machine learning to suggest that limitations in the brain’s ability to multitask result from a fundamental computational dilemma in neural architectures. Through graph-theoretic analysis, neural network simulation, and behavioral experimentation, I will demonstrate that neural systems face a tradeoff between learning efficiency (promoted through the shared use of neural representations across tasks) and multitasking capability (achieved through the separation of neural representations between tasks). Theoretical analyses show that it can be optimal for a neural system to prioritize efficient learning of single tasks at the expense of its ability to execute them simultaneously, across a broad range of conditions. These results suggest that our inability to multitask reflects a rational solution to a fundamental computational dilemma faced by neural architectures. I will demonstrate that this tradeoff can explain a variety of behavioral and neural phenomena related to human multitasking and conclude by outlining consequential computational dilemmas that may help explain other, seemingly irrational constraints on human cognition.

Friday, October 08, 2021

12:00pm-01:00pm
Virtual Event
“Early life stress primes sensitivity to future stress: from epigenetics to engrams” Catherine Jensen Peña, PhD Assistant Professor Princeton Neuroscience Institute
PBS Chair's Annual State of the Department Address 2021
03:30pm-04:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
PBS Annual Welcome Reception 2021
05:30pm-07:30pm
Big Grove Brewery and Taproom, 1225 S Gilbert St, Iowa City, IA 52240

Friday, October 15, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Brown Bag (Cognition): Sarah Colby
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Spoken word recognition in less-than-ideal conditions: The effect of aging, severe hearing loss, and individual differences in inhibitory control
Abstract: While recognizing spoken words, listeners must quickly and efficiently map the input to lexical representations. To deal with the temporary ambiguity that results as speech unfolds over time, potential candidates compete for activation until enough of the word is heard to activate the correct target. Under ideal circumstances, this lexical competition is thought to be largely internal to the language system. However, it’s possible that domain-general cognitive resources are recruited to help resolve competition in challenging conditions. In this talk, I’ll examine how lexical competition is affected by less-than-ideal listening conditions, namely in aging and severe hearing loss. Older adults experience a broad variety of cognitive declines, but vocabulary knowledge remains a noted strength. Despite this, they often report difficulties following conversations, suggesting declines to the cognitive processes supporting language. Individuals with hearing loss, on the other hand, must learn to deal with a severely degraded signal. Using the Visual World Paradigm, we asked how the dynamics of lexical competition change in the face of cognitive and peripheral declines. We also investigated whether domain-general inhibitory control is recruited to compensate for difficulties with word recognition. Our results suggest that both age and hearing loss impact the activation of lexical targets, and that inhibitory control is deployed differently to support word recognition depending on a listener’s hearing status. This work highlights the need to better understand how domain-general resources can be incorporated into models of spoken word recognition.

Friday, October 22, 2021

05:00pm-06:45pm
2229 Seamans Center
Abstract: The use of interactive technologies is changing the way our cognitive processes work: from perception to memory, attention, learning, problem solving, communication, and metacognition. In fact, we may be seeing the beginnings of one of the largest shifts in cognition brought about by technology, perhaps even bigger than the changes brought by handwriting and mathematical notation. The problem is that we have largely been reactive. For the most part, technology designers develop what the market calls for without a holistic view of how all these technologies may affect how we think and how we interact with each other. The good news is that we have choices and we can have visions. What do we want the cognitive future to be like? If we can give people cognitive superpowers through technology, what should those be? In this talk, Juan Pablo Hourcade will provide an analysis of how current and upcoming changes in interactive technologies are affecting and may further affect cognitive processes. This will be followed by a discussion of guiding principles to optimally affect cognitive processes. Bio: Juan Pablo Hourcade is an Associate Professor at The University of Iowa's Department of Computer Science and Director of Graduate Studies for the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Informatics. His main area of research is Human-Computer Interaction, with a focus on the design, implementation and evaluation of technologies that support creativity, collaboration, well-being, healthy development, and information access for a variety of users, including children and older adults.

Thursday, October 28, 2021

03:30pm
W207 Pappajohn Business Building
Abstract:  What does it mean to know one’s body?  In this talk, I focus on the development of functional reaching maps of the body:  how infants learn to localize and reach to stimuli on the surface of body, regardless of the position of the hand in space or that of the target on the body.   Using a new task of tactile localization suitable for use with infants, I will describe work on the development of body reaching during the first year, and how this sensorimotor ability serves as an intermodal gateway to other forms of body knowledge, including mirror self-recognition.

Friday, October 29, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre
Abstract:  What does it mean to know one’s body?  In this talk, I focus on the development of functional reaching maps of the body:  how infants learn to localize and reach to stimuli on the surface of body, regardless of the position of the hand in space or that of the target on the body.   Using a new task of tactile localization suitable for use with infants, I will describe work on the development of body reaching during the first year, and how this sensorimotor ability serves as an intermodal gateway to other forms of body knowledge, including mirror self-recognition.

Wednesday, November 03, 2021

03:30pm-05:00pm
Virtual Event
Anne Anlin Cheng is Professor of English, and affiliated faculty in the Program in American Studies, the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies, and the Committee on Film Studies at Princeton University. She is an interdisciplinary and comparative race scholar who focuses on the uneasy intersection between politics and aesthetics, drawing from literary theory, race and gender studies, film and architectural theory, legal studies, psychoanalysis, and critical food studies.  She works primarily with twentieth-century American literature and visual culture with special focus on Asian American and African American literatures. Professor Cheng is also the founder and organizer of the public conversation series Critical Encounters that promotes dialogue between art and theory and encourages cross-disciplinary conversations on topics of social justice .Her work has appeared in journals such as Critical Inquiry, Representations, PMLA, Camera Obscura, Differences, among others.  She is also a contributor to New York Times, The Atlantic, Los Angeles Review of Books, and Huffington Post Professor Cheng is the author of The Melancholy of Race: Psychoanalysis, Assimilation, and Hidden Grief); Second Skin: Josephine Baker and the Modern Surface; and, most recently, Ornamentalism (which will provide the foundation for this talk). Focusing on the cultural and philosophic conflation between the "oriental" and the "ornamental," Ornamentalism offers an original and sustained theory about Asiatic femininity in western culture. This study pushes our vocabulary about the woman of color past the usual platitudes about objectification and past the critique of Orientalism in order to formulate a fresher and sharper understanding of the representation, circulation, and ontology of Asiatic femininity. This book alters the foundational terms of racialized femininity by allowing us to conceptualize race and gender without being solely beholden to flesh or skin. Tracing a direct link between the making of Asiatic femininity and a technological history of synthetic personhood in the West from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century, Ornamentalism demonstrates how the construction of modern personhood in the multiple realms of law, culture, and art has been surprisingly indebted to this very marginal figure and places Asian femininity at the center of an entire epistemology of race. Drawing from and speaking to the multiple fields of feminism, critical race theory, visual culture, performance studies, legal studies, Modernism, Orientalism, Object Studies and New Materialism, Ornamentalism will leave readers with a greater understanding of what it is to exist as a "person-thing" within the contradictions of American culture (Oxford University Press). Professor Cheng's talk will be followed by a lively discussion. We hope that you will join us for a night of discourse over [digital] dinner. Join Zoom Meeting https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/93996021689?pwd=M0NEZkpSS3hLUGdZWm9oakZtT1hSUT09 Meeting ID: 939 9602 1689 Passcode: 961088 This event is presented by the Association of Graduate Students in English, and was made possible by generous financial support from The Department of English, The Freedman Fund, and The Obermann Center for Advanced Studies.

Friday, November 05, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre
Intelligence is defined by a generalized factor (g), composed of subdimensions, such as visuospatial reasoning, language, and working memory. One such dimension, fluid intelligence, reflects reasoning and the ability to solve novel problems. Adolescent intelligence has been linked with childhood adversity, and may also influence future mental health outcomes, however, much of this research has been based on small clinical samples. In this talk, I will summarize a set of papers that utilized a large population-representative sample of adolescents (ages 13-18) to understand the relationships between childhood adversity, fluid intelligence, and psychopathology. I will also engage with the conceptual, legal, and practical challenges that make intelligence research both contentious and important.  

Thursday, November 11, 2021

03:30pm
W207 Pappajohn Business Building
Spatial thinking plays a central role in scientific problem solving and expert practice. In STEM classrooms, science learners are routinely tasked with reasoning about the spatial properties of phenomena at different scales. As such, visuo-spatial ability is an obvious target for improving student success in STEM fields. Yet, empirical reports have yet to demonstrate that interventions designed to improve visuo-spatial ability yield sizeable or reliable improvements in STEM retention or academic achievement. This talk will examine alternative explanations for the poor predictive validity of visuo-spatial ability in STEM classrooms with attention to the diverse way that spatial thinking manifests in STEM domains. Using results from laboratory studies of chemistry problem solving and educational interventions in chemistry classrooms, I illustrate how various strategies and representational tools of chemistry mediate the relationship between visuo-spatial and academic achievement in the domain. These findings demonstrate that visuo-spatial ability may not be an optimal target for educational interventions and that individual and group differences in visuo-spatial ability have limited utility for identifying potential in STEM.

Friday, November 12, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre

Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Brown Bag (BCN): Shivangi Jain
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, November 19, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Friday, December 03, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
This virtual mini-symposium on epigenetics features presentations from: Andy Groves, PhD, Baylor; Elizabeth Heller, PhD, UPenn; Simon Hippenmeyer, PhD, IST Austria

Wednesday, December 08, 2021

Brown Bag (BCN): Eric Reavis, University of California Los Angeles
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, December 10, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre
03:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Psychological and Brain Sciences Colloquium Edward S. Awh, Professor, Department of Psychology, The Institute for Mind and Biology, and Grossman Institute for Neuroscience, Quantitative Biology and Human Behavior, The University of Chicago The Role of Content-Independent Pointers in Visual Working Memory Storage in visual working memory is highly limited. "Slot" models argue that this reflects a limit on the number of individuated items that can be stored, rather than a limit on the total amount of information held within those items. Why would storage limits be item-based rather than information-based? One possibility is that storage entails the operation of a limited number of spatiotemporal "pointers" (e.g., Khaneman's object files; Pylyshyn's FINSTs) that serve to bind together multiple features of an object. I'll present a multivariate approach for decoding working memory load based on EEG voltage topography. This approach enables trial-by-trial decoding of working memory load, and the load-specific patterns of neural activity generalize across different stimuli and observers. Critically, this load-dependent activity tracks the number of stored items, independent of the type and number of features stored about each item. Thus, our limited ability to deploy these pointers may explain slot-like empirical patterns in behavioral and neural studies of working memory.

Friday, December 17, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Friday, January 21, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Friday, January 28, 2022

09:00am
Virtual Event

Friday, February 04, 2022

PBS Graduate Student Recruiting Weekend -- Friday February 4 & Saturday February 5, 2022
TBA
TBA

Friday, February 11, 2022

Friday, February 18, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.
PBS Graduate Research Symposium 2022
TBA
TBA

Thursday, February 24, 2022

Friday, February 25, 2022

Friday, March 04, 2022

Friday, March 18, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Friday, March 25, 2022

03:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Psychological and Brain Sciences Colloquium Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor and Charles H. Gregory '64 Chair in Liberal Arts, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Texas A&M University

Thursday, March 31, 2022

Friday, April 01, 2022

Friday, April 15, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Friday, April 22, 2022

03:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Psychological and Brain Sciences Spence Lecture Regina M. Carelli, Stephen B. Baxter Distinguished Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina The Spence Lecture Series is sponsored by the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences in honor of the late Professor Kenneth W. Spence, chair of the department from 1942-1964.

Wednesday, April 27, 2022

08:30am-09:30am
Virtual Event
Title TBD Michael Burton, PhD Assistant Professor, Behavioral and Brain Sciences University of Texas-Dallas

Friday, May 06, 2022

03:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Psychological and Brain Sciences Colloquium Elizabeth Brannon, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Chair in the Natural Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania

Friday, May 20, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Friday, June 17, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.