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Monday, August 16, 2021

PBS Graduate Student Orientation
TBA
TBA

Saturday, August 28, 2021

PBS Diversity Virtual Open House
09:00am-04:00pm
Virtual Event

Wednesday, September 01, 2021

Brown Bag (BCN): Data Blitz
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, September 03, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre

Wednesday, September 08, 2021

Brown Bag (Cognition): Data Blitz
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, September 10, 2021

PBS Graduate Research Symposium 2021
09:00am-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
PBS Graduate Research Symposium Reception
04:00pm-05:00pm
Lobby outside B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Saturday, September 11, 2021

BBIP Retreat
09:00am-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, September 17, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre
In this talk, I’ll dive into how our perception is shaped by linguistic input. To do so, I’ll present two lines of my research program. In the first, I’ll argue how language experience is unique to each and every one of us, and what it means to be on the spectrum of bi/multilingualism from the speaker’s side as well as from the listener’s side. I’ll present behavioral data and social network corpus data showing perception of different multilingual experiences, some of which are perceived as foreign accents, and how environmental exposure impacts speech intelligibility and accentedness judgments. In the second, I’ll argue how language experience modulates visuo-cortical processes towards novel objects (i.e., sheinbugs) by showing ERP and ssVEP data from infants as well as adults. The overarching theme of my talk will emphasize the importance of intersectional linguistic research. 
12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Monday, September 27, 2021

07:30pm
Hadley Stage Hancher Auditorium
POSTPONED Due to a scheduling conflict, Bill Nye has postponed his lecture at the University of Iowa. A new date will be announced soon. UI students who already have tickets should keep them as they will be honored for the new date. Distribution of remaining tickets to the general public will be delayed until the lecture has been officially rescheduled.   Engineer, comedian, author, inventor—and best known for his Emmy-winning run as Bill Nye the Science Guy—Bill Nye blends humor, intellectual curiosity, and devotion to solving some of the world’s most complex challenges through science. Nye inspires audiences of all ages to engage with and improve our world.This lecture will feature an American Sign Language interpreter. ARTIST WEBSITE

Wednesday, September 29, 2021

Brown Bag (BCN): Kev You
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, October 01, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
This virtual mini-symposium on sleep features presentations from: Gina Poe, PhD (UCLA); Penny Lewis, PhD (Cardiff U, UK); and Reto Huber PhD (U Zurich and U Children's Hospital Zurich)

Saturday, October 02, 2021

PBS Diversity Weekend
TBA
TBA

Wednesday, October 06, 2021

Brown Bag (Cognition): Sebastian Musslick, Princeton University
12:30pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
On the Rational Bounds of Human Cognition
Abstract: Humans are remarkably limited in the number of tasks they can execute simultaneously. This limitation is not only apparent in daily life, it is also a universal assumption of most theories of human cognition. Yet, a rationale for why the human brain is subject to this constraint remains elusive. In this talk, I will draw on insights from neuroscience, psychology, and machine learning to suggest that limitations in the brain’s ability to multitask result from a fundamental computational dilemma in neural architectures. Through graph-theoretic analysis, neural network simulation, and behavioral experimentation, I will demonstrate that neural systems face a tradeoff between learning efficiency (promoted through the shared use of neural representations across tasks) and multitasking capability (achieved through the separation of neural representations between tasks). Theoretical analyses show that it can be optimal for a neural system to prioritize efficient learning of single tasks at the expense of its ability to execute them simultaneously, across a broad range of conditions. These results suggest that our inability to multitask reflects a rational solution to a fundamental computational dilemma faced by neural architectures. I will demonstrate that this tradeoff can explain a variety of behavioral and neural phenomena related to human multitasking and conclude by outlining consequential computational dilemmas that may help explain other, seemingly irrational constraints on human cognition.

Friday, October 08, 2021

12:00pm-01:00pm
Virtual Event
“Early life stress primes sensitivity to future stress: from epigenetics to engrams” Catherine Jensen Peña, PhD Assistant Professor Princeton Neuroscience Institute
PBS Chair's Annual State of the Department Address 2021
03:30pm-04:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
PBS Annual Welcome Reception 2021
05:30pm-07:30pm
Big Grove Brewery and Taproom, 1225 S Gilbert St, Iowa City, IA 52240

Friday, October 15, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Brown Bag (Cognition): Sarah Colby
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Spoken word recognition in less-than-ideal conditions: The effect of aging, severe hearing loss, and individual differences in inhibitory control
Abstract: While recognizing spoken words, listeners must quickly and efficiently map the input to lexical representations. To deal with the temporary ambiguity that results as speech unfolds over time, potential candidates compete for activation until enough of the word is heard to activate the correct target. Under ideal circumstances, this lexical competition is thought to be largely internal to the language system. However, it’s possible that domain-general cognitive resources are recruited to help resolve competition in challenging conditions. In this talk, I’ll examine how lexical competition is affected by less-than-ideal listening conditions, namely in aging and severe hearing loss. Older adults experience a broad variety of cognitive declines, but vocabulary knowledge remains a noted strength. Despite this, they often report difficulties following conversations, suggesting declines to the cognitive processes supporting language. Individuals with hearing loss, on the other hand, must learn to deal with a severely degraded signal. Using the Visual World Paradigm, we asked how the dynamics of lexical competition change in the face of cognitive and peripheral declines. We also investigated whether domain-general inhibitory control is recruited to compensate for difficulties with word recognition. Our results suggest that both age and hearing loss impact the activation of lexical targets, and that inhibitory control is deployed differently to support word recognition depending on a listener’s hearing status. This work highlights the need to better understand how domain-general resources can be incorporated into models of spoken word recognition.

Friday, October 22, 2021

05:00pm-06:45pm
2229 Seamans Center
Abstract: The use of interactive technologies is changing the way our cognitive processes work: from perception to memory, attention, learning, problem solving, communication, and metacognition. In fact, we may be seeing the beginnings of one of the largest shifts in cognition brought about by technology, perhaps even bigger than the changes brought by handwriting and mathematical notation. The problem is that we have largely been reactive. For the most part, technology designers develop what the market calls for without a holistic view of how all these technologies may affect how we think and how we interact with each other. The good news is that we have choices and we can have visions. What do we want the cognitive future to be like? If we can give people cognitive superpowers through technology, what should those be? In this talk, Juan Pablo Hourcade will provide an analysis of how current and upcoming changes in interactive technologies are affecting and may further affect cognitive processes. This will be followed by a discussion of guiding principles to optimally affect cognitive processes. Bio: Juan Pablo Hourcade is an Associate Professor at The University of Iowa's Department of Computer Science and Director of Graduate Studies for the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Informatics. His main area of research is Human-Computer Interaction, with a focus on the design, implementation and evaluation of technologies that support creativity, collaboration, well-being, healthy development, and information access for a variety of users, including children and older adults.

Thursday, October 28, 2021

03:30pm
W207 Pappajohn Business Building
Abstract:  What does it mean to know one’s body?  In this talk, I focus on the development of functional reaching maps of the body:  how infants learn to localize and reach to stimuli on the surface of body, regardless of the position of the hand in space or that of the target on the body.   Using a new task of tactile localization suitable for use with infants, I will describe work on the development of body reaching during the first year, and how this sensorimotor ability serves as an intermodal gateway to other forms of body knowledge, including mirror self-recognition.

Friday, October 29, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre
Abstract:  What does it mean to know one’s body?  In this talk, I focus on the development of functional reaching maps of the body:  how infants learn to localize and reach to stimuli on the surface of body, regardless of the position of the hand in space or that of the target on the body.   Using a new task of tactile localization suitable for use with infants, I will describe work on the development of body reaching during the first year, and how this sensorimotor ability serves as an intermodal gateway to other forms of body knowledge, including mirror self-recognition.

Wednesday, November 03, 2021

03:30pm-05:00pm
Virtual Event
Anne Anlin Cheng is Professor of English, and affiliated faculty in the Program in American Studies, the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies, and the Committee on Film Studies at Princeton University. She is an interdisciplinary and comparative race scholar who focuses on the uneasy intersection between politics and aesthetics, drawing from literary theory, race and gender studies, film and architectural theory, legal studies, psychoanalysis, and critical food studies.  She works primarily with twentieth-century American literature and visual culture with special focus on Asian American and African American literatures. Professor Cheng is also the founder and organizer of the public conversation series Critical Encounters that promotes dialogue between art and theory and encourages cross-disciplinary conversations on topics of social justice .Her work has appeared in journals such as Critical Inquiry, Representations, PMLA, Camera Obscura, Differences, among others.  She is also a contributor to New York Times, The Atlantic, Los Angeles Review of Books, and Huffington Post Professor Cheng is the author of The Melancholy of Race: Psychoanalysis, Assimilation, and Hidden Grief); Second Skin: Josephine Baker and the Modern Surface; and, most recently, Ornamentalism (which will provide the foundation for this talk). Focusing on the cultural and philosophic conflation between the "oriental" and the "ornamental," Ornamentalism offers an original and sustained theory about Asiatic femininity in western culture. This study pushes our vocabulary about the woman of color past the usual platitudes about objectification and past the critique of Orientalism in order to formulate a fresher and sharper understanding of the representation, circulation, and ontology of Asiatic femininity. This book alters the foundational terms of racialized femininity by allowing us to conceptualize race and gender without being solely beholden to flesh or skin. Tracing a direct link between the making of Asiatic femininity and a technological history of synthetic personhood in the West from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century, Ornamentalism demonstrates how the construction of modern personhood in the multiple realms of law, culture, and art has been surprisingly indebted to this very marginal figure and places Asian femininity at the center of an entire epistemology of race. Drawing from and speaking to the multiple fields of feminism, critical race theory, visual culture, performance studies, legal studies, Modernism, Orientalism, Object Studies and New Materialism, Ornamentalism will leave readers with a greater understanding of what it is to exist as a "person-thing" within the contradictions of American culture (Oxford University Press). Professor Cheng's talk will be followed by a lively discussion. We hope that you will join us for a night of discourse over [digital] dinner. Join Zoom Meeting https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/93996021689?pwd=M0NEZkpSS3hLUGdZWm9oakZtT1hSUT09 Meeting ID: 939 9602 1689 Passcode: 961088 This event is presented by the Association of Graduate Students in English, and was made possible by generous financial support from The Department of English, The Freedman Fund, and The Obermann Center for Advanced Studies.

Friday, November 05, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre
Intelligence is defined by a generalized factor (g), composed of subdimensions, such as visuospatial reasoning, language, and working memory. One such dimension, fluid intelligence, reflects reasoning and the ability to solve novel problems. Adolescent intelligence has been linked with childhood adversity, and may also influence future mental health outcomes, however, much of this research has been based on small clinical samples. In this talk, I will summarize a set of papers that utilized a large population-representative sample of adolescents (ages 13-18) to understand the relationships between childhood adversity, fluid intelligence, and psychopathology. I will also engage with the conceptual, legal, and practical challenges that make intelligence research both contentious and important.  

Thursday, November 11, 2021

03:30pm
W207 Pappajohn Business Building
Spatial thinking plays a central role in scientific problem solving and expert practice. In STEM classrooms, science learners are routinely tasked with reasoning about the spatial properties of phenomena at different scales. As such, visuo-spatial ability is an obvious target for improving student success in STEM fields. Yet, empirical reports have yet to demonstrate that interventions designed to improve visuo-spatial ability yield sizeable or reliable improvements in STEM retention or academic achievement. This talk will examine alternative explanations for the poor predictive validity of visuo-spatial ability in STEM classrooms with attention to the diverse way that spatial thinking manifests in STEM domains. Using results from laboratory studies of chemistry problem solving and educational interventions in chemistry classrooms, I illustrate how various strategies and representational tools of chemistry mediate the relationship between visuo-spatial and academic achievement in the domain. These findings demonstrate that visuo-spatial ability may not be an optimal target for educational interventions and that individual and group differences in visuo-spatial ability have limited utility for identifying potential in STEM.

Friday, November 12, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre

Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Brown Bag (BCN): Shivangi Jain
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Thursday, November 18, 2021

12:00pm-01:00pm
Wild Bill's (321) North Hall
University of Iowa students: Learn “How to Library” from a friendly UI librarian! Dan Gall, the UI Librarian for Social Work & Distance Education, takes time to help you understand the myriad resources (and people) available at the UI to help you find the information you need. From finding the right books and how to check them out, to research concepts, ethics, and citations, Dan is your personal guide to the UI Libraries system. Open to all students, regardless of major. Sessions meet in Wild Bill’s (321 North Hall) and concurrently via Zoom. Dan’s presentations take place from noon to 12:30 p.m., with office hours following until 1 p.m. SESSION 6: Keeping sources and citations organized to improve your academic writing and stay sane.  Social Work Ph.D. students Kara Carter, Megan Ronnenberg and Morgan Stangl share their methods for organizing the articles, books and other sources they cite – with and without Endnote! Join Zoom Meeting:https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/96423320102

Friday, November 19, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Friday, December 03, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
This virtual mini-symposium on epigenetics features presentations from: Andy Groves, PhD, Baylor; Elizabeth Heller, PhD, UPenn; Simon Hippenmeyer, PhD, IST Austria

Wednesday, December 08, 2021

Brown Bag (BCN): Eric Reavis, University of California Los Angeles
12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building

Friday, December 10, 2021

09:00am
2520D University Capitol Centre
Speech sound disorders account for nearly half of all childhood communication impairments. These salient communication disorders also have a relatively stagnant history of traditional, bottom-up remediation approaches designed for mainstream, monolingual English speakers. These traditional approaches may not be optimized for efficiency or maximizing generalized learning. Further, the evidence base fails to address the complex language backgrounds of many children with speech sound disorders. We will discuss language learning and complexity in the context of a speech intervention study for Spanish-English bilingual children.
03:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Psychological and Brain Sciences Colloquium Edward S. Awh, Professor, Department of Psychology, The Institute for Mind and Biology, and Grossman Institute for Neuroscience, Quantitative Biology and Human Behavior, The University of Chicago The Role of Content-Independent Pointers in Visual Working Memory Storage in visual working memory is highly limited. "Slot" models argue that this reflects a limit on the number of individuated items that can be stored, rather than a limit on the total amount of information held within those items. Why would storage limits be item-based rather than information-based? One possibility is that storage entails the operation of a limited number of spatiotemporal "pointers" (e.g., Khaneman's object files; Pylyshyn's FINSTs) that serve to bind together multiple features of an object. I'll present a multivariate approach for decoding working memory load based on EEG voltage topography. This approach enables trial-by-trial decoding of working memory load, and the load-specific patterns of neural activity generalize across different stimuli and observers. Critically, this load-dependent activity tracks the number of stored items, independent of the type and number of features stored about each item. Thus, our limited ability to deploy these pointers may explain slot-like empirical patterns in behavioral and neural studies of working memory.

Friday, December 17, 2021

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Thursday, January 20, 2022

12:00pm-01:00pm
Wild Bill's (321) North Hall
University of Iowa students: Learn “How to Library” from a friendly UI librarian! Dan Gall, the UI Librarian for Social Work & Distance Education, takes time to help you understand the myriad resources (and people) available at the UI to help you find the information you need. From finding the right books and how to check them out, to research concepts, ethics, and citations, Dan is your personal guide to the UI Libraries system. Open to all students, regardless of major. Sessions meet in Wild Bill’s (321 North Hall) and concurrently via Zoom. Dan’s presentations take place from noon to 12:30 p.m., with office hours following until 1 p.m. SESSION 6: Keeping sources and citations organized to improve your academic writing and stay sane.  Social Work Ph.D. students Kara Carter, Megan Ronnenberg and Morgan Stangl share their methods for organizing the articles, books and other sources they cite – with and without Endnote! Join Zoom Meeting:https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/96423320102

Friday, January 21, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Wednesday, January 26, 2022

12:30pm-01:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Human Inhibitory Control Darcy Diesburg In this practice post-doctoral job talk, I will summarize the research I’ve conducted during my graduate career on a fronto-basal ganglia (FBg) network that underlies human motor and cognitive control, namely: the FBg’s recruitment following infrequent stimuli, the inhibitory role of subcortical and cortical beta bursts in this network, and causal perturbations of FBg with transcranial magnetic stimulation and deep brain stimulation. I’ll discuss potential future directions for post-doctoral research, such as using biophysical computational modeling approaches to gain insight into the neuronal mechanisms that produce beta bursts, and explain how that research fits within my broader career goals of using mechanistic insight to bolster cognitive theory in control.    For those that wish to join virtually here is a zoom link: https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/91280986222

Friday, January 28, 2022

09:00am
Virtual Event

Wednesday, February 02, 2022

12:30am-01:30am
For those who wish to join virtually, please contact amy-rood@uiowa.edu. Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Please join us next Wednesday (2/2, 12:30pm) for a special brown bag presentation from Drs. Lane Strathearn and Ted Abel, co-directors of the Hawkeye Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (https://iddrc.uiowa.edu/). They will introduce this newly funded center.  For those who wish to join virtually, please contact amy-rood@uiowa.edu.

Friday, February 04, 2022

09:00am
318 Phillips Hall
This presentation will provide an overview of the new Hawk-IDDRC, an NIH-funded P50 Center aimed at promoting and disseminating interdisciplinary, cross-campus research in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Examples will be provided of cores and services available to IDDRC members, and how these are being utilized in the Autism Genetics and Epigenetics Study (AGES) through the Hawk-IDDRC.   Website: iddrc.uiowa.edu
PBS Graduate Student Recruiting Weekend -- Friday February 4 & Saturday February 5, 2022
TBA
TBA

Friday, February 11, 2022

09:00am
Virtual Event
As adults, speaking appears effortless; yet the functional muscle groups involved are many and their interactions complex. Nonetheless, human infants master this control and coordination while their body is rapidly changing. In this talk, I will first discuss the evolutionary foundation for the role of the body in the production of vocalizations by describing my previous work in marmoset monkeys. Call production in marmosets depends on the dynamic control of heart rate and respiration. I demonstrate how their typical cardiorespiratory activity is maintained within a stable range and the production of species-specific contact calls require cardiorespiratory activity to exit this stable range. The control of body movements around these contact calls also appear to be a key part of the mechanisms enabling them. Similarly, to produce the many different and highly complex sounds that will eventually give way to speech, human infants must learn to successfully control and coordinate their body and its internal states. I present new findings on how bodily movements around the production of sounds become more tightly coordinated with the timing of sound onset from 9 to 24 months of age. I will then present initial evidence and hypotheses on the role of body movement coordination in producing more complex speech sounds. I conclude with a consideration of why understanding the body and the control of its internal states is crucial to understanding the development of cognition. I will provide an overview of my future work, which builds on these initial findings and will consider the role of mature social partners and infant directed speech in influencing the internal states relevant to vocalizations and other cognitive achievements such as visual attention. 

Tuesday, February 15, 2022

04:30pm
Virtual Event
Uncovering Hawkeye History: The Stories That Define Us Since 1847, the University of Iowa has broken barriers and blazed new trails as a beacon for learning, creativity, and collaboration. Join university archivist and storyteller David McCartney and leading experts from multiple fields to uncover the hidden stories that define Iowa. Don’t miss this interactive, four-part online series exploring the University of Iowa’s widespread impact. Endless Innovation: An R1 Research Institution (1948–1997) February 15 4:30 p.m. (CST) Zoom Webinar From using robots that assist with inner ear surgery to breaking space exploration frontiers, the UI has spearheaded innovative ways to approach all aspects of our society. Bruce Gantz (68BS, 74MD, 80MS, 80R), otolaryngology and neurosurgery professor and world’s first doctor to perform a robot-assisted cochlear implant surgery Kevin Washburn, College of Law dean Ed Wasserman, experimental psychology professor whose recent book identifies the secrets to innovation

Thursday, February 17, 2022

12:00pm-01:00pm
Wild Bill's (321) North Hall
University of Iowa students: Learn “How to Library” from a friendly UI librarian! Dan Gall, the UI Librarian for Social Work & Distance Education, takes time to help you understand the myriad resources (and people) available at the UI to help you find the information you need. From finding the right books and how to check them out, to research concepts, ethics, and citations, Dan is your personal guide to the UI Libraries system. Open to all students, regardless of major. Sessions meet in Wild Bill’s (321 North Hall) and concurrently via Zoom. Dan’s presentations take place from noon to 12:30 p.m., with office hours following until 1 p.m. SESSION 6: Keeping sources and citations organized to improve your academic writing and stay sane.  Social Work Ph.D. students Kara Carter, Megan Ronnenberg and Morgan Stangl share their methods for organizing the articles, books and other sources they cite – with and without Endnote! Join Zoom Meeting:https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/96423320102

Friday, February 18, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.
PBS Graduate Research Symposium 2022
TBA
TBA

Thursday, February 24, 2022

04:00pm
Virtual Event
All normal children in normal environments acquire language. However, all normal children in normal bilingual environments do not acquire two languages. Focusing on data from studies of second- generation immigrant children and young adults from Spanish-speaking homes in the U.S., this talk asks why the acquisition of two languages is more difficult than the acquisition of one. The evidence points to multiple ways in which the environmental supports that language acquisition requires are not equally available for both languages in minority-majority language bilingual communities.

Friday, February 25, 2022

09:00am
Virtual Event
All normal children in normal environments acquire language. However, all normal children in normal bilingual environments do not acquire two languages. Focusing on data from studies of second- generation immigrant children and young adults from Spanish-speaking homes in the U.S., this talk asks why the acquisition of two languages is more difficult than the acquisition of one. The evidence points to multiple ways in which the environmental supports that language acquisition requires are not equally available for both languages in minority-majority language bilingual communities.

Friday, March 04, 2022

09:00am
Virtual Event
Come prepared to share ideas about how to  make both our science and our scientists better reflect the diversity of people and backgrounds in the world. We’ll drop into small breakout rooms in five minute increments to share ideas.  At the end, we’ll gather to highlight the best ideas. https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/98229132946

Wednesday, March 09, 2022

Brown Bag (Cognition): Dina Popovkina, University of Washington
11:30am-12:30pm
Virtual Event
Multiple objects limit object recognition
Abstract: Our daily environment contains many diverse objects, and hidden image games such as "Where's Waldo?" illustrate the challenge of recognizing multiple simultaneously viewed objects. In this talk, I assess how multiple objects limit recognition performance, characterize whether the limiting processes are serial, and propose how such processes might be reflected in underlying brain activity. In the first part of the talk, I present evidence that judgments of multiple objects substantially limit recognition. These findings help establish which aspects of object-based tasks contribute to the observed performance limits. Interestingly, there are conditions in which the limits are consistent with serial processes; that is, processing is limited to only one object at a time. In the last part of the talk, I propose a study pursuing how brain activity in regions subserving visual object recognition might correlate with serial processing.

Thursday, March 10, 2022

12:00pm-01:00pm
Wild Bill's (321) North Hall
University of Iowa students: Learn “How to Library” from a friendly UI librarian! Dan Gall, the UI Librarian for Social Work & Distance Education, takes time to help you understand the myriad resources (and people) available at the UI to help you find the information you need. From finding the right books and how to check them out, to research concepts, ethics, and citations, Dan is your personal guide to the UI Libraries system. Open to all students, regardless of major. Sessions meet in Wild Bill’s (321 North Hall) and concurrently via Zoom. Dan’s presentations take place from noon to 12:30 p.m., with office hours following until 1 p.m. SESSION 6: Keeping sources and citations organized to improve your academic writing and stay sane.  Social Work Ph.D. students Kara Carter, Megan Ronnenberg and Morgan Stangl share their methods for organizing the articles, books and other sources they cite – with and without Endnote! Join Zoom Meeting:https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/96423320102

Friday, March 18, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Wednesday, March 23, 2022

12:30pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
Psychological and Brain Sciences BCN Area Brown Bag Dr. Anastasia Kiyonaga, Assistant Professor, Department of Cognitive Science, University of California San Diego (Zoom link will be provided.)

Friday, March 25, 2022

03:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Psychological and Brain Sciences Colloquium Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor and Charles H. Gregory '64 Chair in Liberal Arts, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Texas A&M University "Covert Capture and Attenuation of Hippocampus-Dependent Fear Memory"

Thursday, March 31, 2022

04:00pm-05:00pm
106 Gilmore Hall
What algorithms power animal intelligence? How can we reproduce these algorithms in machines? To address these questions, I developed an interdisciplinary approach at the intersection of psychology, artificial intelligence, and video games. Using a video game engine, we raise newborn animals and ‘newborn’ artificial agents in the same virtual worlds, then test their behavior with the same tasks. Since the animals and agents are tested in the same video game environments, we can directly compare the learning abilities of brains and machines. In this talk, I will describe how my lab is using this approach to reverse engineer object perception and collective behavior. By modeling animals as “runnable” artificial agents raised in realistic virtual worlds, we can build engineering-level models of the brain’s learning mechanisms, capturing enough causal structure in the mechanisms to reproduce them in machines. These learning algorithms are an untapped goldmine for next-generation artificial intelligence systems and can serve as rigorous computational models for studying the origins and computational foundations of intelligence.

Friday, April 01, 2022

09:00am-10:30am
318 Phillips Hall
What algorithms power animal intelligence? How can we reproduce these algorithms in machines? To address these questions, I developed an interdisciplinary approach at the intersection of psychology, artificial intelligence, and video games. Using a video game engine, we raise newborn animals and ‘newborn’ artificial agents in the same virtual worlds, then test their behavior with the same tasks. Since the animals and agents are tested in the same video game environments, we can directly compare the learning abilities of brains and machines. In this talk, I will describe how my lab is using this approach to reverse engineer object perception and collective behavior. By modeling animals as “runnable” artificial agents raised in realistic virtual worlds, we can build engineering-level models of the brain’s learning mechanisms, capturing enough causal structure in the mechanisms to reproduce them in machines. These learning algorithms are an untapped goldmine for next-generation artificial intelligence systems and can serve as rigorous computational models for studying the origins and computational foundations of intelligence.

Friday, April 15, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Thursday, April 21, 2022

12:00pm-01:00pm
Wild Bill's (321) North Hall
University of Iowa students: Learn “How to Library” from a friendly UI librarian! Dan Gall, the UI Librarian for Social Work & Distance Education, takes time to help you understand the myriad resources (and people) available at the UI to help you find the information you need. From finding the right books and how to check them out, to research concepts, ethics, and citations, Dan is your personal guide to the UI Libraries system. Open to all students, regardless of major. Sessions meet in Wild Bill’s (321 North Hall) and concurrently via Zoom. Dan’s presentations take place from noon to 12:30 p.m., with office hours following until 1 p.m. SESSION 6: Keeping sources and citations organized to improve your academic writing and stay sane.  Social Work Ph.D. students Kara Carter, Megan Ronnenberg and Morgan Stangl share their methods for organizing the articles, books and other sources they cite – with and without Endnote! Join Zoom Meeting:https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/96423320102

Friday, April 22, 2022

03:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Psychological and Brain Sciences Spence Lecture Regina M. Carelli, Stephen B. Baxter Distinguished Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina The Spence Lecture Series is sponsored by the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences in honor of the late Professor Kenneth W. Spence, chair of the department from 1942-1964.

Wednesday, April 27, 2022

08:30am-09:30am
Virtual Event
Title TBD Michael Burton, PhD Assistant Professor, Behavioral and Brain Sciences University of Texas-Dallas

Thursday, April 28, 2022

03:30pm-05:00pm
106 Gilmore Hall
The DeLTA Center and Matthew Lira (Educational Psychology and Learning Sciences) invite you to join us for an embodied programming experience where faculty and students collaborate to build a simple robot and discuss the classic problem of embodiment in cognitive science. The robot will be built with magnetic blocks called Cubelets—these blocks are pre-programed to either Sense, Think, or Act (see the video “Meet Cubelets”). So, they are modular, but when we combine them in unique configurations they can display increasing complexity.   Each of 4 teams will receive their own 6 blocks plus 1 battery. Our builds will be guided by the question: “What makes the robot’s cognition (or computation if you prefer) embodied or not compared to that of a human (or non-human organism if you prefer)?”   The Cubelets are intended to be a way to ground (eh hem) our conversation—one that connects back to the Turing test and the innovative Spivey test! In sum, if the Turing test asked an AI system to fool a human that it too was human, then the Spivey test asks a human to fool another human that they are an AI system! So, in the spirit of this intellectual debate, we want to discuss what criteria, if any, would allow us humans to grant embodiment to robots? Readings (optional … for context) Ziemke, T. (2001, September). Are robots embodied. In First international workshop on epigenetic robotics Modeling Cognitive Development in Robotic Systems (Vol. 85, pp. 701-710). Spivey, M.J. (2000) Turning the tables on the Turing test: The Spivey test. Connection Science, 12:1, 91-94, DOI: 10.1080/095400900116212

Friday, May 06, 2022

03:30pm
B70 Psychological and Brain Sciences Building
Psychological and Brain Sciences Colloquium Elizabeth Brannon, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Chair in the Natural Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania [Dr. Brannon's colloquium has been moved to the Fall Semester.]

Tuesday, May 17, 2022

PBS Departmental Picnic (Rain date: Thursday May 19)
12:00pm-01:00pm
Green space behind PBSB, Iowa City, IA 52242

Friday, May 20, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.

Friday, June 17, 2022

12:00pm-01:30pm
Virtual Event
The Big Ten Neuroscience Seminar Series highlights trainees and junior faculty from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in neuroscience. We meet virtually once each month—featuring one Big Ten institution—for presentations and discussion/networking. Seminars are scheduled for afternoons on the third Friday of each month. Zoom link is provided by the host institution. If not added in the event listing, please email iowa-neuroscience-institute@uiowa.edu the week of the seminar to receive the link.